Skip to main content
LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS 
of
Larimer County, Colorado

Cross Currents Presents
Metro Districts:  Who Benefits? Who Pays?

January 23  7 PM
Fort Collins City Hall

Please join us for an important discussion about Metropolitan Districts - their benefits, costs, background and future.  

·         What is a metro district; how does it differ from a planned unit development or a home owners association?

·         Why would a developer prefer a metro district to a planned unit development?  

·         What is the city's or county's  role in approving and/or administering a metro district?  What is the responsibility of those in the metro district....pay fees/taxes, participate on boards or committees?  

·         What benefits and problems have occurred in Colorado cities and counties but especially in Loveland/Fort Collins and in Larimer County?

·         Are there issues of transparency for those in a metro district?

·         How can the problematic issues be corrected or should the law allowing them be changed?

Panelists:

Ross Cunniff, Fort Collins City Council member

Jacki Marsh, Mayor of City of Loveland

Bill Ankele, Esq.  White Bear Ankele Tanaka & Waldron

Michael Valdez, Director of Policy, Special District Association of Colorado


Audience questions are encouraged. 
larimer metro districts


Welcome to
LWV Larimer County

Empowering Voters
Defending Democracy

The League of Women Voters of Larimer County is a nonprofit, non-partisan political organization that encourages the informed and active participation of citizens in government; works to increase understanding of major public policy issues; and influences public policy through education and advocacy. Our members, women and men ages 16 and up, volunteer their time year round to help Make Democracy Work!

We are a member of the national League of Women Voters which was formed when women finally gained the right to vote in 1920. Throughout the League’s nearly 100 year history and working in all states, the League focus has been to expand participation and give a voice to all Americans. It never endorses, supports or opposes any political candidate or political party.


Slideshow
lwv flicker demos

2020 Legislative Outlook

 

"Health care, family leave headline Colorado 2020 session"

James Anderson, The Associated Press Published 4:26 p.m. MT Jan. 8, 2020 | Updated 5:07 p.m. MT Jan. 8, 2020



DENVER — "Majority Democrats declared that a state-supervised public option for Coloradans seeking health insurance and an ambitious family medical leave proposal headline their agenda for the 2020 legislative session that started Wednesday.

Democrats who won control of both chambers in 2018 also vowed to build on legislation passed last year to extend health care coverage, lower rates, and put a spotlight on hospital and prescription drug prices. …

Minority Republican leaders are wary of more state involvement in insurance markets and any involvement when it comes to business leave offerings for their employees.

Again, they insisted that Colorado's roads get their fair share of state spending without raising taxes.

In their opening day remarks, leaders from both sides professed a desire to avoid a repeat of a rancorous 2019 session in which Democrats overhauled regulation of the oil and gas industry and passed a gun bill designed to remove firearms from persons deemed by a court to be a threat to themselves or others."...

Read the complete article

ERA Success on the Horizon in Virginia?


From the Associated Press
Virginia Moves to Brink of Becoming 38th State to Ratify ERA

RICHMOND, Va. — Virginia on Wednesday moved to the brink of becoming the crucial 38th state to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment in what was seen as a momentous victory for the women's rights movement even though it is far from certain the measure will ever be added to the U.S. Constitution.

The state House and Senate approved the proposed amendment with bipartisan support, well over a generation after Congress sent the ERA to the states for ratification in 1972. Each chamber now must pass the other's resolution, but final passage is considered all but certain.

Amendments to the Constitution must be ratified by three-quarters of the states, or 38. But whether this one will go on to become the 28th Amendment may have to be decided in court because the deadline set by Congress for ratification of the ERA ran out in 1982 and because five states that approved it in the 1970s have since rescinded their support.

Still, the twin votes carried symbolic weight and showed how much once-solidly conservative Virginia, a place that defeated the ERA time and again, has changed. ...


Read the Complete Article


We invite you to:

  • Join our dynamic members – men and women – to study issues, learn, engage in civil deliberations and take action. We provide members with training and tools so that they can feel empowered to speak out on issues.
  • Use the resources on this website to educate and empower yourself.
  • Join us at our public events.



Voter Services
Recent Blogs
Recent Blogs


 

UPCOMING EVENTS


Upcoming Events



Support the
 National Popular Vote!
 

Colorado Ballot Issue in 2020

The National Popular Vote would guarantee the Presidency to the candidate who receives the most popular votes across all 50 states and D.C.. The bill ensures that every vote, in every state, will matter in every presidential election.  The bill is a constitutionally conservative, state-based approach that preserves the Electoral College, preserves state control of elections, and preserves  the power of the states to control how the President is elected.

The LWVUS believes that the direct popular vote method for electing President and Vice-President is essential to representative government.  In 2010, the League adopted support of the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact as an acceptable way to achieve the goal of the direct popular vote for election of the president and vice-president.

For more information,


Visit our Election Reform Page
Political.....but Non-Partisan

Since its founding, the League of Women Voters committed to neither support or oppose any political party or candidate for public office.  This tradition continues today to ensure that the League’s voice is heard above the tumult of party politics.  The nonpartisan policy has added strength to the League’s position on issues.  It has made possible wide acceptance of League voter service and other educational activities.

Nonpartisan means that the League never supports or opposes political parties or candidates or appointees.  All League members need to remember that the League’s reputation for fairness is long-standing and hard-won and needs to be guarded.  We invite you to read more about our Non-Partisan Policy


Although we DO NOT support candidates, we do research, recommend, and support ballot issues that are supported by League positions.

The League is a political organization and encourages members to participate fully in the party of their choice.  It is an advantage to the League to have politically active members, and equally important, it can be a personally satisfying experience.


“In the League of Women Voters we have an anomaly; we are going to be a semi-political body.  We want political things; we want legislation; we’re going to educate for citizenship.  In that body we have got to be non-partisan and all-partisan.  Democrats from Alabama and Republicans from New Hampshire must work for the same things.”

Carrie Chapman Catt at the League’s founding in Chicago, 1920


What does this mean for Members?

Individual League members are encouraged to be politically active.  However, when they participate in partisan activities, they may not identify themselves as League members.

A League will be a strong and effective political force to the degree that it can deal with and accept controversy and live with uncertainty.

Keep in mind that conflict of interest may arise between a “board” member’s paid employment and her or his role in the League.  Visit with a member of the Administrative Team with any concerns or questions you may have.

League Statements

No member (including officers) may speak for the League unless they have first obtained review and approval by a majority of Administrative Team of the proposed statement.


Key Member Restrictions

Certain individuals who have high public visibility as officers or leaders of the League (Key Members) are restricted from partisan activity.  Members can  review the details in our Member Notebook.




                                                        
The League of Women Voters Larimer County
is part of

The League of Women Voters Colorado and
The League of Women Voters US